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Dead iPhone Battery Replacement Guide: DIY or Hire It Out?

Is your iPhone battery dead? We compare battery replacement options, including battery brands, pricing, and replacement services.

In a world reliant on mobile communications, a dead iPhone battery can be one of the most frustrating misfortunes you’ll face – especially since Apple hasn’t made it easy to replace your iPhone battery. Here, we compare different iPhone battery replacement options to help you decide how to replace your iPhone battery.

DIY versus battery replacement services

The iPhone doesn’t feature a battery door or removable rear case that allows easy access to your battery, which means battery replacement involves a bit of disassembly. If you feel comfortable taking your iPhone apart (and confident in your ability to put it back together), you can save money by replacing your own iPhone battery. If the DIY method makes you nervous or you simply don’t want the hassle, an iPhone battery replacement service can do it for you. Here’s what you can expect from both methods.

NOTE: If your iPhone is still under warranty (12 months standard, 24 months with Apple Care+) and your battery retains less than 80 percent of its original capacity, Apple will replace your battery free-of-charge.


Replacing your own iPhone battery

DIY iPhone battery replacement has gotten progressively more difficult. For older generations like the iPhone 4, the process involves removing a few screws and disconnecting a few wires to access the battery. For seasoned tinkerers, the process isn’t that complicated and can be done in as little as 20 minutes. Even less-experienced iPhone owners should be able to do it in under an hour, as demonstrated in this video:

Recent generations like the iPhone 7, 8, X and XS are more complicated. The process can take up to two hours and involves heating the front screen and removing internal components to access the battery, as demonstrated in this video guide to iPhone 7 battery replacement:

Generally speaking, iPhone battery replacement has become more difficult with successive generations. Though the iPhone X is similar to the iPhone 7 and 8, even more steps are required to replace your battery:

Thinking about doing it yourself? Considering a phone repair business? Here’s where & how to learn phone repair

If you decide to go the DIY route, understand there are risks involved with replacing your own battery. They include:

  • You will void the warranty (and if it’s under warranty, why not just have Apple replace it for free?)
  • You’ll void your carrier insurance policy, if you have one
  • If you break something, you might have to pay someone else to repair it (and that could cost far more than the original battery replacement)
  • It’s possible for poorly constructed aftermarket batteries to leak acid, catch fire or explode

That said, all you need are a replacement battery and some special tools for opening your iPhone. Many iPhone parts retailers sell complete replacement kits that include both the battery and tools required to complete the repair.

Did you know? Many phones are worth $100+. Find the value of your phone.

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Where to buy iPhone replacement batteries

Apple does not sell OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) parts to the public, which means you’ll need to purchase your replacement iPhone battery from a third-party manufacturer via a retail seller. Here are some options, the brands they offer, and what they cost.

Replacement batteries and toolkits

RetailerBrandsPrice RangeProsCons
AmazonScandi Tech, URepair, Tech Ahead, Daeta, Battery+$12 – $30 for battery plus toolkitReviews shed insight into which brands perform best; some sellers offer a one-year warrantyBattery warranties might not cover damage to iPhone if battery is faulty. Does not have batteries for all iPhone models
Ebay/SellersGeneric$4 – $65 for battery plus toolkitCheapest prices; reputable sellers have good reviews. Can find batteries for recent iPhone modelsTypically, no warranty; OEM battery claims are dubious
Digital SupplyUnknown$20 – $45 for battery plus toolkitOne-year warranty; direct seller; free shippingWarranty may not cover damages. Does not have batteries for most recent models
Repairs UniverseUnknown$10 – $34 for battery plus toolkitSame-day shipping; direct seller; 30-day limited warrantyWarranty may not cover damages. Does not have batteries for most recent models
iFixitiFixit$12 – $90 for battery plus toolkitSelf-branded, direct-seller; one-year warranty. Has batteries for most recent iPhone modelsSite does not make mention of warranty coverage for damages
Direct FixUnknown$5 – $17 for battery plus toolkitDirect-seller; free shipping; 30-day warrantyWarranty may not cover damages. Does not have batteries for most recent models
Battery ShipX-Longer$15 – $31 for battery plus toolkitDirect-seller; free same-day shipping; one-year warrantyWarranty may not cover damages. Does not have batteries for most recent models

How much does iPhone battery replacement cost?

Here’s a list of popular replacement service fees (be sure to understand what each warranty covers):

As you can see, the only drawbacks to paying someone else to replace your iPhone battery are increased price and, in the case of mail-in repairs, going without your iPhone for a few days.

Online Phone Repair: How it works & what it costs

Should you pay a repair service or replace your own iPhone battery? That ultimately depends on whether you feel comfortable replacing your own battery and if you want to hassle with the repair at all. For the tech-savvy budget-minded, DIY might be the best option; for those lacking the ability or desire to perform the repair, it might be better to hire an iPhone repair company to replace your iPhone battery.

Related Help

How to make any iPhone repair

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LG battery replacement: DIY or hire it out?

Online phone repair: How it works & what it costs

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